Welcome to Webtalk Western Sahara! πŸ™‹

Will Western Sahara be the first country to fully embrace Webtalk and will you be part of it? πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯

Do you want to be part of this revolution? Then join us right now and help us build this amazing alternative for a better world. 🌍

Do you know that in the coming years, many people will live from their Webtalk commissions? πŸ’° You definitely want to be part of it, and help make Western Sahara a wealthy country thanks to Webtalk and its generous affiliate program. πŸ€
This is how much you can earn with Webtalk.

We want to build a strong Webtalk Users Community in Western Sahara and we want you to be part of it by joining Webtalk right now in our team. πŸ… Our community will soon have its own Webtalk Page, when Webtalk Pages become available. For the moment, this is the homepage of the Webtalk community in Western Sahara. 🌍 Leave a comment below if you want to be part of it!

We are also the proud sponsors of the Webtalk Invite Days, a global monthly meet-up to help adopt Webtalk. Checkout if there is an event near you here.

About Western Sahara

Western Sahara (Arabic: Ψ§Ω„Ψ΅Ψ­Ψ±Ψ§Ψ‘ Ψ§Ω„ΨΊΨ±Ψ¨ΩŠΨ©β€Žβ€Ž aαΉ£-αΉ’aαΈ₯rā’ al-GharbΔ«yah; Berber languages: TaneαΊ“roft Tutrimt; Spanish and French: Sahara Occidental) is a disputed territory on the northwest coast and in the Maghreb region of North and West Africa, partially controlled by the self-proclaimed Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic and partially occupied by neighboring Morocco. Its surface area amounts to 266,000 square kilometres (103,000Β sqΒ mi). It is one of the most sparsely populated territories in the world, mainly consisting of desert flatlands. The population is estimated at just over 500,000,[2] of which nearly 40% live in Laayoune, the largest city in Western Sahara.

Occupied by Spain until the late 20th century, Western Sahara has been on the United Nations list of non-self-governing territories since 1963 after a Moroccan demand.[3] It is the most populous territory on that list, and by far the largest in area. In 1965, the UN General Assembly adopted its first resolution on Western Sahara, asking Spain to decolonize the territory.[4] One year later, a new resolution was passed by the General Assembly requesting that a referendum be held by Spain on self-determination.[5] In 1975, Spain relinquished the administrative control of the territory to a joint administration by Morocco (which had formally claimed the territory since 1957)[6] and Mauritania.[5] A war erupted between those countries and a Sahrawi nationalist movement, the Polisario Front, which proclaimed the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (SADR) with a government in exile in Tindouf, Algeria. Mauritania withdrew its claims in 1979, and Morocco eventually secured de facto control of most of the territory, including all the major cities and natural resources. The United Nations considers the Polisario Front to be the legitimate representative of the Sahrawi people, and maintains that the Sahrawis have a right to self-determination.[7]

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